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October 2012 Blog Posts

  • Be Wary of Flood Damaged Vehicles After Sandy

    Hurricane Sandy

    Megastorm Sandy has finished cutting a path of destruction throughout the northeast portion of the U.S., but the impact of this epic storm will be felt in the auto industry for quite a while. One thing to be particularly aware of is the influx of flood-damaged vehicles into the used car market, as detailed in an article at The Detroit Bureau.

  • J.D. Power Picks Safest Small Sedans for 2012

    JD Power

    Many auto buyers are looking to downsize their vehicles, whether it’s to save money on fuel costs or simply to spend less on their next car purchase. One common concern with the move to a smaller vehicle is safety. There’s a certain comfort driving a larger vehicle know there’s more metal mass surrounding you. More car to absorb more impact. Luckily, manufacturers are paying close attention to occupant safety, especially as they look to sell more small cars.

  • Used Car Prices Dropping

    Used Cars

    After a dramatic rise in used car prices in recent years, it appears that these prices have now started a slow downward trend, according to a report by NADA.  Over the past three years, used car prices had soared, growing nearly 20% since 2009. The main reason for this run-up was simple supply and demand. Because of poor new car sales due to the economic recession, the demand for used cars increased. But the lack of new car sales also meant fewer trade-ins, thus less used car supply. Less supply + more demand = higher prices.

  • Top 10 Cars With Character for Halloween as Selected by AutoBuying101.com

    Top 10 Cars With Character for Halloween

    Halloween is here, and folks of all ages will be dressing up as their favorite characters and heading to Halloween parties or hitting the streets for tricks or treats. This got us thinking about some very distinctive-looking cars; vehicles with character to spare. So we here at AutoBuying101.com have picked our Top 10 Cars With Character for Halloween. We’ve gathered up photographic evidence to illustrate our picks, and we think you’ll be amazed by the resemblances.

  • Honda to Dealers: Clear Out 2012 Civics

    Honda Civic

    Get ready for aggressive deals on 2012 Honda Civics. Honda has told dealers to clear out their current stock of 2012 Civics in advance of the debut of the hastily refreshed 2013 models, according to a report from Autoblog.

  • Nissan To Offer More Hybrids

    Nissan

    As the car market was exploding with multiple flavors of hybrids, from Prius to Escalade, Nissan made a big bet that electric cars would be the real future of energy efficiency, rather than hybrids. Thus, they poured all their efforts into developing and marketing the all-electric Leaf, and virtually ignored the hybrid marketplace. Sure, they had a hybrid Altima for a while, but that borrowed technology from Toyota rather than being developed in-house. The only other hybrid in the family is the Infiniti M.

  • Ford C-Max Energi Tops Prius Plug-In for Fuel Efficiency

    Ford C-Max Energi

    For a number of years, Toyota’s Prius has been the nation’s best-selling, most feature-packed hybrid vehicle. It’s the hybrid that’s been the most efficient product on the market. This is no longer the case. The 2013 C-Max Energi, from Ford, has just taken over the title of most “fuel-efficient” Hybrid on the market.

     

    A Word on How the EPA Efficiency Ratings for Hybrids Work

  • Most and Least Expensive SUVs and Trucks to Insure

    Car Insurance

    As auto buyers, we tend to focus most of our energy on the purchase cost of our vehicles, and other than fuel cost, we spend less time thinking of the ongoing costs. Of course, figuring our fuel cost is relatively simple; the MPG is listed right on the window sticker and with a little quick math in our head, we can easily guesstimate our gas bill.

  • Another Big Toyota Recall, Yet Still Tops in Loyalty

    Toyota Logo

    Toyota announced the recall of 2.5 million vehicles in the U.S., part of 7.4 million worldwide to address an issue with the driver’s side power window switch. If not properly maintained, this issue could result in melting, smoke, and possibly fire. This, on top of several years of assorted other recalls, now totalling over 14 million.

  • Small is Big

    Small is Big

    In a land where lumbering SUVs once roamed like so many dinosaurs, small car sales have grown to levels not seen is nearly 20 years, so says a report on Bloomberg.com.

    One reason is obvious; soaring gas prices. It is a knee-jerk consumer reaction proven time and again; when gas prices rise, so too do sales of gas-efficient cars. And save for an early summer respite, we’ve seen gas prices rise all year.

  • Self-Driving Cars On The Way

    Google Self-Driving Car

    If you live in Southern California you’ve heard about them repeatedly. Maybe you’ve even seen them. Self-driving cars. The sight of them can be alarming: “What? Those cars are moving faster than I am, are about three to four feet apart, and the drivers are READING THE NEWSPAPER?” Google has been developing autonomous cars that will hopefully decrease the worry of serious accidents as well as gridlock woes. These self-driving cars took another big step towards everydayday reality when California Governor Jerry Brown signed a bill that paves the way for their full legalization.

     

    Why Autonomous Vehicles? 

  • Infiniti Leads in Emotional Attachment

    Infiniti

    Much of what we talk about here at AutoBuying101.com is very pragmatic automotive analysis. How does one particular car compare to another? Who’s offering the best incentives? How is the gas mileage?

    But what about the emotional component? How much do we love our cars?

    The LEAP Index from New Media Metrics measures emotional attachment to all varieties of consumer brands, not just cars. LEAP stands for Leveraging Emotional Attachment for Profit, and their proprietary research model asks questions designed to measure this emotional attachment, on a scale of 1 to 10. They then calculate the percentage of people who answer 9 or 10.